Five Things About Jasper Tudor You Really Will Want to Know (if you don’t already)

In my latest episode of the Renaissance English History Podcast I talked to Melita Thomas of Tudor Times about Jasper Tudor, uncle to Henry VII and perhaps the true Kingmaker of the 15th century.  I hadn’t know much about Jasper, other than what I’ve read in historical fiction (there is a lovely…

Continue reading

A Week in London at Christmas with a Toddler

So I’ve been negligent in posting lately (I’m getting back on top of that – thanks for sticking with me).  I got back from a week in London with a 2 year old, which is no small feat, let me tell you.  And on top of it all, the first…

Continue reading

7 Reasons to Visit Ely

Many people who are doing the tourist circuit of England hit Cambridge, but most will leave without journeying the 17 or so miles to visit the hidden gem that is Ely, just to the North.  It’s one stop I demanded be included on our Spring Cathedrals and Choirs tour for…

Continue reading

Cambridge, and the draining of the Fens

It’s October, which means that I’m in my head planning for another year spending November in a NaNoWriMo haze in addition to the tryptophan-induced sleep coma of Thanksgiving.  In case you don’t know, NaNoWriMo is National Novel Writing Month, wherein participants pledge to write a 50,000 word novel in 30 days.…

Continue reading

John Dee: Brilliant Scientist and Occult Philosopher

John Dee

I’ve just recently uploaded a new episode of my Renaissance English History Podcast, which focused on trade and exploration in Elizabethan England.  While researching it, I came upon several interesting men who had major roles in the creation of the Age of Discovery.  One was Sebastian Cabot, the son of…

Continue reading

5 Reasons Cirencester is a Hidden Magical Gem (aka History Travel Tuesday)

There are a handful of cities in Europe that were once major epicenters of the universe, but are now snoozy little hamlets who betray nothing of their illustrious pasts.  Cordoba comes to mind.  The place was once pretty much the center of the universe, and the most populous city in…

Continue reading

Staying relevant in pop culture after 500 years: Tallis and Spem in Alium

A few months ago I went to pull up a recording of Thomas Tallis’ Spem in Alium, his famous 40 part motet written for 8 5-part choirs.  I hadn’t listened to it in a while, and it was the kind of day that called for some later Tallis.  The recording that came…

Continue reading

Favorite Places and Spaces: Soho in London

When I lived in London, I worked at 76 Brewer Street, on the end of Soho near Golden Square, on the eastern end, tucked away from the tourists of Piccadilly, Leicester Square, and Oxford Street on all sides, a neighborhood of its own.  What used to be a hunting ground…

Continue reading

launching the bigworld tour company, and why I love early choral music

This year I am embarking on a new project as an entrepreneur who leads cultural tours to England, specializing in trips to listen to great choral services in cathedrals.  My dear friend Jim and I are building a tour company, our first trip is scheduled for May 2016, and I’ve been working on…

Continue reading

Favorite Places and Spaces – Cirencester

So let me tell you about my trip to the UK last week.  It was full of excitement (ie meeting with one of my idols, the early music expert David Skinner, to interview him for my podcast), and peace (long train journeys criss crossing the country, listening to my music…

Continue reading